The Moor, Old Red Lion Theatre

The Moor, Old Red Lion Theatre - Jill McAusland courtesy of The Other Richard_3.jpg

by an anonymous guest critic

Lucie’s play The Moor uncovers the nightmarish reality of Bronagh (Jill Mcausland), a new Mother stuck in a state of abysmal claustrophobia from the landscape which she is in constant fear of and an abusive relationship with her partner Graeme (Oliver Britten).

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Curtain Call, White Bear Theatre

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The backstage comedy has been around for what feels like as long as theatre itself, and it’s difficult to improve upon or innovate it. Simon Bradbury’s attempted dark comedy Curtain Call takes a different direction, instead using the genre to look at ageing, failure and unrequited love. The overwritten script needs significant cutting and dramaturgical streamlining, but it has a dynamic premise that looks at an often-ignored demographic.

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Good Girl, Old Red Lion

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by guest critic Joanna Trainor

“This is for people who burst at the seams.”

How do you cope with anxiety when you’re too young to know what it is? This initially appears to be what Good Girl is going to be about – how as children it is so instilled in us  to please others, that the pressure completely warps our sense of self and creates huge problems within our relationships.

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The Black Eye Club, Bread & Roses Theatre

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Zoe’s back at her commuter belt town’s refuge after her husband beat her up again. This time it’s because Palace lost. Last time, it was because she was nagging to much. She jokes about what will bring her here the next time with her new friend Dave, an anxious gay man who escaped through his bathroom window after his partner beat the shit out of him again. Dave’s not allowed in the refuge, but Zoe felt bad and snuck him in.

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Tryst, Tabard Theatre

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George Joseph Smith was a petty thief and con man who preyed on the most vulnerable women he could find. He would win their love, persuade them to elope, then strand them on their honeymoon after cleaning out their bank account. In exchange, these women who were lonely and insecure, would have a wedding night of bliss. He thought this was more than fair.

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