Diamond, Soho Theatre

https://i0.wp.com/www.qxmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/david-hoyle-by-Lee-baxter-696x464.jpg

by guest critic Gregory Forrest

What a mess! David Hoyle’s exploration of rainbow Britain and his own career is a rather queer turn of events. It plays. It experiments. It breaks. Above all, it asks whether there may be something truly radical in messiness. And it never gives a straight answer.

Continue reading

Advertisements

This Beautiful Future, Yard Theatre

https://theyardtheatre.co.uk/website/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/This-Beautiful-Future-at-the-Yard-Theatre.-_50A5976.jpg-Photo-by-Mark-Douet.jpg

by guest critic Nastazja Somers

France 1944. A young French girl Elodike runs to meet her lover, a German soldier Otto. Their love is innocent and pure, the exact opposite of the world around them. This is a place that has been torn by war, despair and hunger. Yet the young pair of lovers find time and space to make love, talk about their family and friends, and most importantly connect – despite their differences.

Continue reading

Notorious, Barbican Centre

https://i2.wp.com/theupcoming.flmedialtd.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/NOTORIOUS-feat.-Lauren-Barri-Holstein-Krista-Vuori-Brogan-Davison-by-Manuel-Vason_Fierce_day3_5-1000x600.jpg

by guest critic Nastazja Somers

It wasn’t by accident that I ended up seeing The Famous Lauren Barri Holstein’s new work The Notorious at The Barbican Centre. Give me feminism, plenty of liquids and general messiness on stage and I’m there, screaming my head off, like when Lucy McCormick performed her Triple Threat two years ago at Edinburgh Fringe.

Continue reading

Hansel & Gretel, Museum of Childhood

https://i1.wp.com/www.theartsdesk.com/sites/default/files/images/stories/OPERA/Alexandra_Coghlan/H%26G3.jpeg

I’ve never been to the V&A’s Museum of Childhood, let alone after hours. But in the expansive hall and gift shop, one corner has been set up as a playing space for Popup Opera’s Hansel & Gretel. There are shelves of toys and other souvenirs behind us, and sterile glass display cases behind the stage. Our cozy pocket in the grand room has a sinister gloom surrounding what with the autumn evening’s quickly fading light. It’s a suitable space for a story that mostly takes place in the woods overnight, when fairies and witches come out to play.

Continue reading

The Toxic Avenger, Arts Theatre

https://www.londontheatre1.com/wp-content/gallery/the-toxic-avenger-the-musical/THE-TOXIC-AVENGER-THE-MUSICAL-4-Mark-Anderson-as-Toxie-Photo-Irina-Chira-min.jpg

I’ve seen sexist theatre. I’ve seen ableist theatre. But it’s rare to come across a show that is so openly and unashamedly both of these things.

Even more frustrating, these aspects of the story are heightened and played for laughs. There’s no commentary or condemnation, just the worst parts of cult movies rolled into one superhero story reliant on anti-women stereotypes. The performances are excellent and there are some great tunes, but the overtly offensive storyline overwhelms any of the production’s positive aspects.

Continue reading

Bullish, Camden People’s Theatre

https://newimages.bwwstatic.com/upload11/1694799/tn-500_bullishlowres0017.jpg

Asterion wanders through the night, in a world that doesn’t really fit them. The minotaur of Greek myth, Asterion is the only one of their kind to exist. Asterion is bull-ish, neither human nor bull. Or, both human and bull. Either way, they’re on the hunt for adventure and way out of a labyrinth.

Continue reading