Katie & Pip, Edinburgh Festival Fringe

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By Laura Kressly

Some facts: Katie is 15 years old. She has a dog called Pip. When she grows up, she wants to be an animal trainer. She has an older brother called Rob, and was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes when she was two years old. 

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Flies, Edinburgh Festival Fringe

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by Laura Kressly

Theatre doesn’t need another all-white, all-male absurdist production ridiculing vulnerable people. Whilst fun in its staging and innovative in its storytelling, Flies lazily exploits cishet, male power dynamics in a Kafka-esque nightmare for fly-phobic Dennis whilst exploiting systemic, patriarchal structures to make him even more of a victim.

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Egg: Richard Pictures, Edinburgh Festival Fringe

Egg

by guest critic and photographer Esther Moorton

Egg may be a comedy, but the underlying message behind the sketches is that women are still underrepresented in comedy, in the workplace and are still being objectified. “Hello, my name is Sharon” is the tagline for this show and serves as a reminder that any one of us can be subjected to sexism and objectification.

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Kin, Edinburgh Festival Fringe

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By Laura Kressly

Sarah and Lilly haven’t seen each other in 20 years. They’re now awkwardly navigating each other in their father’s kitchen somewhere in rural America. As they wait for their dad to die, the sisters comb through their pasts in the hope of finding out where everything went wrong. But with two very different sets of memories, is it possible to forgive?

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Sparks & Cry God for Harry, England and St George!, Edinburgh Festival Fringe

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by Laura Kressly

Using the word ‘strong’ to describe women and girls is redundant. Putting up with all the trash that women have to deal with as a result of their gender, on top of everything else life throws at them, makes them strong by default. If they are queer, women of colour, disabled, working class, or fall in any other category that others them, this makes them even tougher because life is all the harder.

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