Hansel & Gretel, Museum of Childhood

https://i1.wp.com/www.theartsdesk.com/sites/default/files/images/stories/OPERA/Alexandra_Coghlan/H%26G3.jpeg

I’ve never been to the V&A’s Museum of Childhood, let alone after hours. But in the expansive hall and gift shop, one corner has been set up as a playing space for Popup Opera’s Hansel & Gretel. There are shelves of toys and other souvenirs behind us, and sterile glass display cases behind the stage. Our cozy pocket in the grand room has a sinister gloom surrounding what with the autumn evening’s quickly fading light. It’s a suitable space for a story that mostly takes place in the woods overnight, when fairies and witches come out to play.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Feature | An open letter to Music Theatre Wales

https://owlartistmanagement.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Johnny-Herford-Golden-Dragon.jpg

by Paulina Brahm

A letter to Music Theatre Wales:

I’d also like to engage The British Council and additionally Birmingham Repertory and
Hackney Empire in my letter, as both Birmingham Repertory and Hackney Empire are Arts Council-funded.

I’m Paulina Brahm; an Asian-American actress, singer, and voiceover artist. I trained in
voice and acting in New York City; acting under much-missed Broadway director Gene
Frankel and voice under leading spinto soprano Dolores Mari of the New York City Opera. I am a full lyric soprano with coloratura flexibility and I now live, work and sing in the UK.

Continue reading

Jane Eyre, National Theatre

https://static.standard.co.uk/s3fs-public/styles/story_large/public/thumbnails/image/2017/09/28/08/nt-jane-eyre-tour-2017-ensemble.-photo-by-brinkhoffmgenburg-12.jpg

One of the unfortunate side effects from my time as a secondary school Drama teacher is that Brechtian staging has been ruined for me forever. Brecht is particularly beloved by Drama teachers what with his trademark styles that work particularly well with low production budgets and the diverse abilities of most Drama classes. He is also part of GCSE and A-level syllabuses, and as such, I’ve imparted his techniques to young people entirely too frequently over my short time at the chalkface. His work will long be associated with devised exam productions and low-budget school plays, so anything similar on a professional stage is burdened by those memories.

Continue reading

My Country; a work in progress, Theatre Royal Stratford East

https://cdn.thestage.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/10165417/My-Country-Dorfman-51.jpg

After 52% of 72% of the British voting population voted to leave the EU, Rufus Norris’s concern that London theatre was out of touch with the majority of British people drove him to launch a nationwide project of listening. He sent a team of ‘gatherers’ to all corners of these sceptered isles, and they collected 70 interviews from people up and down the country. The transcriptions combined with text by Carol Ann Duffy gave birth to My Country; a work in progress.

Continue reading

I Hear You and Rejoice, Tricycle Theatre

https://cdn.thestage.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/13115659/I-Hear-You-And-Rejoice-2-Mikel-Murfi1-700x455.jpg

by guest critic Maeve Ryan

I Hear You And Rejoice is a tribute to the power of the single storyteller.  Lighting, costume and staging are simple, revealing the power of the skilled actor. The result is a joyful play full of sentimentality that is also hugely funny.

This is the followup to the much-loved The Man In The Woman’s Shoes, also written and performed by Mikel Murfi. Both plays began their journey following a research period  interviewing older people in Murfi’s native Sligo. Having performed the play back to the very people he had interviewed for inspiration, The Man In The Woman’s Shoes debuted at The Hawkswell in Sligo. It has since toured extensively to audiences at home and abroad.

Continue reading

Home, Ovalhouse

http://i2.wp.com/frozenlighttheatre.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/HOME-rehearsals-JMA-Photography-54.jpg

Scarlet and Olive were left behind when the evacuation transport left their town without them. A dust storm has rendered their home a foreign landscape. They have five days until the transport will return to collect any stragglers, and news is due over the radio at any time between now the then. The resourceful young women must work together to find water and build a shelter so they can survive until someone comes back to get them, and the audience of people with profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD) is there to help.

Continue reading