Hole, Royal Court Theatre

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by Maeve Campbell

Leaving the Royal Court after watching Ellie Kendrick’s new play Hole, I overhear another audience member describe feeling like she has just been “hit over the head with a sledgehammer”. It’s a pretty apt description.

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Ladykiller, Pleasance

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by Amy Toledano

Ladykiller by Madeline Gould is a grizzly dark comedy that turns the patriarchy on its head with its feminist theme. Produced by the Thelmas and directed by Madelaine Moore, this one-woman show leaves audiences tingling with fear from beginning to end and wondering if everything is really as it seems.

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Hadestown, National Theatre

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By Laura Kressly

How can we radically reinvent myths and classic literature? I mean, really radically – not in a box ticking way, or a modernisation the production wears like a piece of costume that doesn’t really change the thematic core of the story. I mean thoroughly, totally, completely. So all traces of horrible ‘isms’ and ‘ists’ are either reframed or criticised. 

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NetherBard, TheatreN16

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by Amy Toledano

In a man’s world, Budding Rose Productions is creating space where women take the lead, playing the kings, the warriors, and fools. And while our four actresses bring guts to this unique show, the potential for a feminist, Shakespearean world isn’t completely met. The characters feel quite 2D and a desperate need of fleshing out is in order to deliver such a powerful message.

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She-Wolves, Edinburgh Festival Fringe

by guest critic Rebecca JS Nice

I took a punt with She-Wolves on a rainy day in Edinburgh at Greenside. A historian and feminist myself, a title like She-Wolves is right up my alley. As well as that, the rising status of gender history and a search for female heroines across the arts makes it a piece of its time.

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Tabarnak & Casting Off, Edinburgh Festival Fringe

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By Laura Kressly

Circus is a a marvellous showcase of physical skill and the possibilities of the human body, but with this often comes a sexualised view of women and men dominating the form with their strength. Tabarnak certainly focuses on the latter, with the women serving more as support to the acts. Fortunately there’s feminist circus in the form of Casting Off that challenges women’s role in society and the circus.

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