And Tell Sad Stories of the Death of Queens, King’s Head Theatre

by guest critic Greg Forrest

Trans drag queen Candy Delaney (Luke Mullins) is about to turn thirty-five, with three properties in New Orleans, a successful interior decorating business, and a leak in her heart. Looking to leave this little empire to someone, Candy picks up a “straight” sailor in a gay bar (George Fletcher), and makes a tentative offer.

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A Little Hero, White Bear Theatre

by guest critic Meredith Jones Russell

A devastating and often surreal critique of a state’s oppression of a minority, with a strictly limited dissemination in the country it was written in, A Little Hero is a brave first play for young company DoneDid. Its production at the White Bear Theatre in Kennington doesn’t always quite get it right, but makes a worthy and powerful attempt.

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The Laundry, Drayton Arms Theatre

by guest critic Amy Toledano

The Laundry is a lovely collaboration of writing by 15 Degrees Theatre that explores womanhood across many generations and across many cultures. Travelling across Europe from Russia, the play begins with two sisters and ends in three stories that will have you wanting to ring your mum the minute it ends.

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Pity, Royal Court Theatre

by guest critic Amy Toledano

Walking into the Royal Court to see Rory Mullarkey’s new show Pity, one is welcomed by a full brass band, a working ice-cream stand and a heck of a lot of colour. The energy in the room is buzzing but has a slight edge. From the first moment it is evident that this show is going to be a new theatre experience for me.

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Invisible Light, Tristan Bates Theatre

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by associate editor Joanna Trainor

“In a world where the truth is hard to come by, raising your voice and removing the mask can be the boldest act of them all.”

The above premise for Invisible Light sounds a little sanctimonious, but it’s not actually an hour of people patting themselves on the back for being so right-on. It’s really seven short stories that explore identity and what that means in 2018, and all but one* of them are a little bit tongue-in-cheek, or play with the idea in some way.

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