Bury the Hatchet, Hope Theatre

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by Amy Toledano

Despite the incredibly hot conditions at The Hope Theatre during the heatwave, the cast of Bury The Hatchet manage to create a highly energised and engaging piece recounting and investigating the story of supposed axe murderer Lizzie Borden.

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Exit the King, National Theatre

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By Laura Kressly

There’s little that’s exciting about watching a petulant, man-child of a king taking 90-odd minutes to die whilst his two wives, a housekeeper, a guard and a ‘doctor’ debate his legacy and the reported collapse of his kingdom. But the design, that climactically progresses along with the king’s death, in this new version by Patrick Marber is a fine reward for enduring the tedium of snarky melodrama that makes up most of the performance.

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The Laundry, Drayton Arms Theatre

by guest critic Amy Toledano

The Laundry is a lovely collaboration of writing by 15 Degrees Theatre that explores womanhood across many generations and across many cultures. Travelling across Europe from Russia, the play begins with two sisters and ends in three stories that will have you wanting to ring your mum the minute it ends.

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Pity, Royal Court Theatre

by guest critic Amy Toledano

Walking into the Royal Court to see Rory Mullarkey’s new show Pity, one is welcomed by a full brass band, a working ice-cream stand and a heck of a lot of colour. The energy in the room is buzzing but has a slight edge. From the first moment it is evident that this show is going to be a new theatre experience for me.

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Invisible Light, Tristan Bates Theatre

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by associate editor Joanna Trainor

“In a world where the truth is hard to come by, raising your voice and removing the mask can be the boldest act of them all.”

The above premise for Invisible Light sounds a little sanctimonious, but it’s not actually an hour of people patting themselves on the back for being so right-on. It’s really seven short stories that explore identity and what that means in 2018, and all but one* of them are a little bit tongue-in-cheek, or play with the idea in some way.

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